Dennis Leri

The Archimedean Lever


Give more effective Functional Integration lessons by using what Moshe called the "Archimedean Lever." Simply stated, each person uniquely organizes him/herself from a certain point or area. Moshe said that from this point he could move a person’s universe.

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By Dennis Leri


Give more effective Functional Integration lessons by using what Moshe called the "Archimedean Lever." Simply stated, each person uniquely organizes him/herself from a certain point or area. Moshe said that from this point he could move a person’s universe.

The desire to be effective in giving Functional Integration lessons is often thwarted by not knowing precisely where to begin and how to proceed. In 1979 in Tel-Aviv, Moshe Feldenkrais delineated what he called the "Archimedean Lever." With the ability to see and sense that point, one can give lessons that address and shift both the "how" and "what" of the FI dynamics. In this two-day FI-based workshop, you can watch Dennis elucidate the concept of the Archimedean Lever through FI demonstrations, lecture and generous individual instruction.

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Chapter Titles

Introduction
Finding the Axis of the Shoulder
Connecting the Axis of the Shoulder in Sitting
The Archimedean Lever
Lifting and Compressing the Head in Relationship to the Chest and Shoulders
Clarification with and Individual Student
Compression Through the Spine
Establishing the Central Line
Finding the Archimedean Lever Lying on the Side
Using the Spine as an Archimedean Lever
Questions and Answers
Connecting the Pelvis to the Archimedean Point
The Essential in FI
Dennis Leri graduated from the first U.S. Feldenkrais training program and worked closely with Dr. Feldenkrais from 1973 to 1984 in the U.S. and at the Feldenkrais Institute in Tel-Aviv, Israel. He directed numerous training programs and was widely regarded as an innovative and inspiring teacher.
 
Dennis complemented his teaching with the Neuro-Epistemology of Francisco Varela, Humberto Maturana and Heinz von Forester. He also had a long-time interest in Western philosophy, Buddhism and had deep experience in the martial arts. During his life, Dennis practiced the Method in various forms for more than 30 years.

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